Kashmir Unique culture

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Kashmir is painted with a unique culture that keeps you intrigued throughout your journey, from Srinagar to Sonamarg and Gulmarg till Pahalgam. My love for Kashmir has only grown stronger over the years. And quite expectedly, Kashmir did not disappoint. If you happen to have a conversation with Kashmiris, you would surely get overwhelmed by the simplicity, love, and hospitality of its people. Years of conflicts, struggles and torture might have changed the way how people outside of Kashmir perceive its inhabitants, but it has not changed KASHMIRI people. For a week, we traveled to some touristy and not so touristy places in Kashmir. From places we stayed in, to people we happened to meet –  shopkeepers, taxi drivers, shepherds, everybody made us feel at home. We found them genuine in their conversations and very positive as a community.

Kashmir is the northernmost geographical region of the Indian subcontinent. Until the mid-19th century, the term “Kashmir” denoted only the Kashmir Valley between the Great Himalayas and the Pir Panjal Range. Today, it denotes a larger area that includes the Indian-administered territory of Jammu and Kashmir (which includes the divisions Jammu, Kashmir Valley, and Ladakh), the Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan, and Chinese-administered territories of Aksai Chin and the Trans-Karakoram Tract.

In the first half of the 1st millennium, the Kashmir region became an important center of Hinduism and later of Buddhism; later still, in the ninth century, Kashmir Shaivism arose. In 1339, Shah Mir became the first Muslim ruler of Kashmir, inaugurating the Salatin-i-Kashmir or Shah Mir dynasty. Kashmir was part of the Mughal Empire from 1586 to 1751, and thereafter, until 1820, of the Afghan Durrani Empire. That year, the Sikhs, under Ranjit Singh, annexed Kashmir. In 1846, after the Sikh defeat in the First Anglo-Sikh War, and upon the purchase of the region from the British under the Treaty of Amritsar, the Raja of Jammu, Gulab Singh, became the new ruler of Kashmir. The rule of his descendants, under the paramountcy (or tutelage) of the British Crown, lasted until the partition of India in 1947, when the former princely state of the British Indian Empire became a disputed territory, now administered by three countries: India, Pakistan, and China.

Kashmir is painted with a unique culture that keeps you intrigued
throughout your journey, from Srinagar to Sonamarg and Gulmarg till Pahalgam.
My love for Kashmir has only grown stronger over the years. And quite
expectedly, Kashmir did not disappoint. If you happen to have a conversation
with Kashmiris, you would surely get overwhelmed by the simplicity, love,
and hospitality of its people. Years of conflicts, struggles and torture
might have changed the way how people outside of Kashmir perceive its
inhabitants, but it has not changed KASHMIRI people. For a week, we traveled to
some touristy and not so touristy places in Kashmir. From places we
stayed in, to people we happened to meet –  shopkeepers, taxi
drivers, shepherds, everybody made us feel at home. We found them genuine
in their conversations and very positive as a community.

Kashmir is the northernmost geographical region of the Indian
subcontinent. Until the mid-19th century, the term “Kashmir” denoted
only the Kashmir Valley between the Great Himalayas and
the Pir Panjal Range. Today, it denotes a larger area that includes the
Indian-administered territory of Jammu and Kashmir (which includes
the divisions Jammu, Kashmir Valley, and Ladakh), the
Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan,
and Chinese-administered territories of Aksai Chin and
the Trans-Karakoram Tract.

In the first half of the 1st millennium, the Kashmir region became an
important center of Hinduism and later of Buddhism; later still,
in the ninth century, Kashmir Shaivism arose. In 1339, Shah
Mir became the first Muslim ruler of Kashmir, inaugurating
the Salatin-i-Kashmir or Shah Mir dynasty. Kashmir was part
of the Mughal Empire from 1586 to 1751, and thereafter, until
1820, of the Afghan Durrani Empire. That year, the Sikhs,
under Ranjit Singh, annexed Kashmir. In 1846, after the Sikh defeat
in the First Anglo-Sikh War, and upon the purchase of the region from the
British under the Treaty of Amritsar, the Raja of Jammu, Gulab Singh,
became the new ruler of Kashmir. The rule of his descendants, under
the paramountcy (or tutelage) of the British Crown, lasted until
the partition of India in 1947, when the former princely
state of the British Indian Empire became a disputed territory,
now administered by three countries: India, Pakistan, and China.

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